The Sovereign Mind

Free thought on politics and real life

Cash For Clunkers: Simply Unsupportable

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For those who don’t know, the government will give you $4,500 to trade in your old clunker and buy a brand new car. Sounds like a good deal, but as far as public policy is concerned, the program is simply unsupportable.

There are two reasons that proponents give to support the program:

1) The program supposedly helps the environment by getting gas guzzlers off the road and replacing them with newer, more efficient cars. It is debatable whether the program has any positive impact on the environment at all. And even if it does, the minimal impact begs the question: what else could we have spent that money on that would have helped the environment much more? It’s a little like going out to an expensive restaurant, and then justifying the expense by saying, “Well, we had to eat, right?”

2) The program is supposed to help stimulate the economy by getting people to buy new cars. Even those who see through the environmental argument often agree that it has succeeded in that purpose. And I don’t disagree, but let’s look at the issue more closely.

First, let’s start with the basics: Every dollar that the government spends is a dollar out of the pockets of a tax-payer. That should be obvious, but it seems that we sometimes forget this basic fact, maybe because we don’t see our tax bill increase at the passage of these sorts of programs. But it is true, whether the money comes from tax-dollars directly, or is borrowed (and therefore will be paid by future generations of tax-payers), or is printed (which we pay for because of the inherent devaluation of existing currency). There is no escaping the fact that there is no such thing as free money.

With this is mind, can this program be considered as anything more than taking money away from people who don’t want to buy a new car, and giving it to someone who does? The government is essentially telling you, “If you aren’t going to buy a new car, we’ll take your money and give it to someone who will.” By doing this, the government subverts the dichotomy that, during a recession, it is in each individual’s best interest to save money, but it is in the economy’s interest that we spend. I don’t blame the government for attempting to find ways to stimulate the economy during a recession, but giving people the choice of spending money or losing it is beyond over-reach.

So we must ask ourself this question: is it more important to (slightly and artificially) stimulate a sector of the economy for a very short period of time, or is it more important to respect our freedom to save or spend our money as we please? Maybe some in congress may disagree, but it seems to me that the answer to that question is obvious.

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Written by Mike

August 9, 2009 at 9:04 pm

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